Thursday, March 3, 2011

MS AND ALTERNATIVES

Since I was diagnosed with MS in 2003, I've always looked at alternative treatments, accepting some, (LDN and diet,) and rejecting others, (bee-sting therapy, for one.)  Similarly, I initially tried prednisone and copaxone, two standard treatments,  and rejected others such as the depression-causing beta-interferons and now Tysabri and the like.                                                                                                                                                  
I'm optimistic about CCSVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency) research and treatment and not just because it seems to be giving considerable relief to about 1/3 who have the procedure.   Although I am one who had only minor results from my CCSVI venoplasty,  I'm not discouraged and have been awaiting further developments before considering it again.  As one with PPMS, I may never duplicate the best success  but I'm confident that the research will eventually throw some light on my situation.
http://ccsvi.org/                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        We need to find the people, medical and otherwise, who will partner with us in our search for healing.  I'm convinced that Norman Cousins had a handle on something really valuable when he advocated for daily laughter and I make sure I get plenty.           

LDN clearly worked for me right away. I still take it and I think I always will. The reduction in fatigue was immediate and dramatic.  A few years ago, I went out of town and forgot my LDN and oh, sister, could I tell what it had been doing for me.  It was research I don't need to repeat!
http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/                                                                                                              
Dr. Terry Wahls has much to say about a healing diet that's interesting and useful and she certainly has an amazing personal story to tell about healing her own MS.
http://www.terrywahls.org/                                                                                                                  
There are others with similar success - George Jelinek, for example:
http://www.overcomingmultiplesclerosis.org/                                                                                               
Yeah, I know, I know....diet is the worst, the absolute hardest thing to change. I get it. I had to first persuade myself to be open minded enough to read it, then argue myself into trying one tiny thing. All I can say is, if I get too much saturated fat in a day, I can tell by the way I walk the next day; when I eat lots of fruits and vegetables, after a few days I feel stronger and actually crave more of them.  It gets easier to make the food choices when you are getting results.                                                                                                                        
What's next for me?  The big bugaboo:  sugar!  I've gone years without it but not since  I was diagnosed. Now I've got 2 weeks under my belt.  Some days are, well ... aaarrrrrgggghhh! but mostly it's not that awful to bite down on each juicy section of a clementine instead.                                                                                                                                                     
My Mom was raised by the daughter of a country doctor; it was a considered a reflection on his medical skills if his family got sick, so, though they were always well-attended, they were encouraged to minimize their illness and not wallow in it. Mom did everything she could to make us laugh and lighten up if we were sick.  She started me on the track and other lessons I've learned along the way have set me up for being able to deal with MS.                                                                                                                                                                                    The fact that I use a scooter for walks longer than 100 feet does not prevent me from having an excellent quality of life situation.  I really believe that is because my attitude gives me hope for the future and lots of fun in the meantime.

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